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Thread: Green LED submersible light

  1. #1

    Default Green LED submersible light

    Can someone tell me if using a green submersible led light does any good while night fishing kokanee. I saw a boat on Loon Lake, Wa using one.

  2. #2

    Default Green Light

    No one responded so i got a green led light and tried it this summer. I put it down about 25ft in 35ft of water. The plankton are attracted to the light to the point it looks like a dark cloud. The kokanee come in and feed and i fish a glow hook with corn + maggot maybe 6ft from the light. Seems to work i've caught just over 200 this year so far.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Steamboat Springs,CO
    Posts
    60

    Default Koke Lights

    Thanks for the information on the lights.

  4. #4

    Default

    "In short, fish pay the least attention to the blue light (not the white-blue light from the diode, namely the blue light from the light filter). And the human vision is the least irritating and fatiguing ""warm"" light in 3000-4500K. It is, by the way, and the fish are less scary than the cold white light.
    In the UF range, the fish see quite well. In this respect, we cannot keep up with them, and this spectrum does not bother them much. Green LED lights make everything around more contrast, but you can not shine it all night, and your eyes get tired of it the fastest. The best red light in the spectrum of 3000-4500K. Comfortable primarily for the fisherman. And blue - comfortable for fish and very uncomfortable for the fisherman."
    Last edited by TabithaWright; 11-06-2022 at 11:01 PM.

  5. #5

    Default Several things i would like clarification on...

    Quote Originally Posted by TabithaWright View Post
    "In short, fish pay the least attention to the blue light (not the white-blue light from the diode, namely the blue light from the light filter). And the human vision is the least irritating and fatiguing ""warm"" light in 3000-4500K. It is, by the way, and the fish are less scary than the cold white light.
    In the UF range, the fish see quite well. In this respect, we cannot keep up with them, and this spectrum does not bother them much. Green LED lights make everything around more contrast, but you can not shine it all night, and your eyes get tired of it the fastest. The best red light in the spectrum of 3000-4500K. Comfortable primarily for the fisherman. And blue - comfortable for fish and very uncomfortable for the fisherman."
    First, I do not have any experience night fishing so my questions/points may not be applicable. When night fishing for kokanee is the purpose of the light to attract the plankton or the fish or both? It sounds like the post from 2018 that you responded to, noted the light attracted the plankton which in turn attracted the fish?? Your post addresses the impact on the fisherman (which does not make sense to me if the light is several feet underwater??) and to a degree on fish. What is "UF" range? When a fish is attracted to light at night what is the reason? You mention the Green provides more contrast - for the fish or people? Does this allow fish to see their food easier? If the light is 25 feet underwater then it will have very limited impact on the fisherman I expect. In fact i expect the fisherman to watch the pole and not try to look at the light and see what is going on. Are you referring to using the light above the water where it would impact the fisherman? Thanks, and BTW, what is your background where you have insight into this topic?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    North Ogder
    Posts
    286

    Default

    I have used a submersible green light at Pinveiw for crappie with good success. I put it down 20 feet because that's how long the cord is on it.

    I have also used it on the Utah side of the Gorge while Burbot fishing with good success. I will put it right of the bottom.

    I think it attracts the small stuff and that attracts the bigger stuff.

    I have only used it ice fish and it makes a green glow around the area you are fishing.
    I haven't checked on the Wyoming regs in the last few years but it was not legal to use artificial light.

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