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RalphL
09-28-2014, 01:39 AM
I have heard they will start stocking koke in Fish Lake next year.. Anyone else heard that How is the fishing there..

Bduck
09-28-2014, 11:42 AM
I haven't heard anything on this but that doesn't mean it can't or won't happen. With the current population of type fish in this lake, one has to wonder if koke survival can make it. 101smily101

http://wildlife.utah.gov/hotspots/detailed.php?id=3

RalphL
09-28-2014, 12:08 PM
macks,splake, rainbow, possible tiger musky.. sounds like a rough start but the news came from a good source.. Make any sense as a food source for other species??

COKEANEE
09-28-2014, 04:30 PM
Yep the lake trout will enjoy them but they should be able to provide for a great kokanee fishery as well. The DWR will be planting a lake spawning breed of kokanee, what ever they are, some time next year.

SuperD
09-29-2014, 11:23 AM
I don't know the topography of Fish Lake but a fish biologist I know says that lake structure or zones has everything to do with fish being able to co-exsist in the same body of water. In CA, we have a few lakes that DF&G plants 50,000 kokes a year and no one has ever caught one.

RalphL
09-29-2014, 01:24 PM
Yep the lake trout will enjoy them but they should be able to provide for a great kokanee fishery as well. The DWR will be planting a lake spawning breed of kokanee, what ever they are, some time next year.

a lake spawning species?? Ever been succesfull anywhere else??

Kokaholic
09-29-2014, 06:12 PM
Many of the kokes that are in the gorge are lake spawners. They have done pretty well there.

COKEANEE
09-29-2014, 11:57 PM
I'm all for it. We need more deep water kokanee lakes in Utah. Especially in central Utah.

SuperD
09-30-2014, 02:11 PM
"Deep water" seems to be a rare commodity in Utah. What are some other lakes that would be good candidates for Kokanee?

COKEANEE
09-30-2014, 06:18 PM
Ya SuperD I didn't type exactly what I meant with that last post. Fish Lake will be a nice addition for kokanee fishing, I am very happy with the DWR's decision. There is another deep lake that has had kokanee in it and after Oct. 17th I'll let you know how successful it is so far.

Bduck
09-30-2014, 06:54 PM
With all of the mountain lakes here deep water is not rare. DNR from what I'm hearing has plans to add Kokanee to some lakes but they have their criteria. With current stock reports, more game fish are being added to areas that they are not native to. There is also the illegally dumping of certain species of fish in the lakes that's been taken into consideration.

https://dwrapps.utah.gov/fishstocking/Fish

SuperD
09-30-2014, 07:11 PM
What are you calling, "deep water" Roger? Everything in our back yard would be shallow IMO. Labeling a lake as deep means it has to have more than a couple of acres of deep water.

Kokaholic
09-30-2014, 10:17 PM
Dave, that still doesn't help. What depth do you consider deep water.

SuperD
09-30-2014, 10:34 PM
100' - 200'.

Bduck
09-30-2014, 11:20 PM
Dave, Why am I being questioned when I fish in 120-150'+ in some of these smaller lakes. I'm not sure what you see when I take you out fishing but the surroundings I'm seeing is the Rocky Mountains. One thing I think we can all agree on is to build more reservoirs with the growing populations. If your going to refer to the Salt Lake Valley, you'll only find warm water species here with a depths of maybe 70' max. Let's face it the lakes in the western states are suffering due to the lack of water but is worse on the west coast. Most lakes here can drop 50' level and still have a deep canyon/s of water. You have seen deep water in Bear L, East Canyon, Jordenelle, Strawberry and then you have some that have lesser such as Rockport and Hyrum Res which these 2 lakes are obviously not good candidates. DNR is doing the studies which I can assure you they can give every reason in their book why or why not kokes will be stocked. E Canyon use to be stocked with kokes but stocking ended around the 1992 time frame. Porcupine Res is a self sustaining Kokanee lake which when water levels drop you would think this lake wouldn't hold kokes with its lesser depths. Maybe others will chime in here of other lakes south of our northern area. Don't forget that aquatic invasive species are in the mix now.

Kokaholic
09-30-2014, 11:42 PM
I think you pretty much said it all roger.

SuperD
10-01-2014, 12:25 AM
Roger, I'm not questioning you as much as stating my opinion that a small lake with a deep hole does not make a deep water lake. I live at sea level and have 3 koke lakes with in an hour drive.

Bduck
10-01-2014, 11:07 AM
Strawberry is a high elevation lake. One side of it is Soldier Creek which is deep with good koke population. However on the other side of the fence, Strawberry side is a lot shallower with good kokanee population. Dave, both Causey & Porcupine are small lakes with sustainable koke populations. Moon Lake is another sustainable but I have never been there to say what its greatness is about. I also understand the harsh summer climate of the Sacramento Valley (been there, lived there) and there kokes could not live in a lake outside of deep water. It sounds like they can live in most situations depending on climate, lake size, and this case 2 very different parts of the country, sea level vs. mountain states. One other scenario, I use to fish Donner Lake, CA and it strikes me as a not very deep lake but elevation near 8000' and colder water sustain kokanee. Once again each states fish & game departments have their own criteria. Maybe our state guy here Ryno can give us an insight of what's on the table in the future and what criteria are they looking for. Its obvious that funding is the game changer.

mtncat1
01-18-2015, 07:41 PM
I don't think depth is as important to kokanee production as temperature and food supply. straw berry is much shallower than soldier creek 75' v/s 130' . yet the kokanee fishing on the strawberry side is as good or better than soldier creek. I think fish lake would be an excellent lake to produce good size kokes not like the babies in most lakes.

SuperDaveMT
01-20-2015, 05:32 PM
My primary koke fishing lake is a 500 acre regulating reservoir for the local irrigation district at an elevation of about 3800 feet. The deepest water in the lake is 50 feet at full pool with an 8 -10 foot swing in the water level from full pool to the lowest level. I catch lots of kokes in the 12 - 16 inch range, with a few occasionally pushing 20 inches. The surface temperature will get up in to the 60s during the summer. I catch most of my fish in the 12 - 18 foot range, so I think it is probably more a thermocline issue that a depth issue. We catch kokes all year, trolling or thru the ice. No natural production though. Any idea why triploid kokanee aren't more widely stocked in lakes with no natural production? I understand it costs more up front, but you wouldn't experience a die off of all the 3 year olds every year.